Monday, April 26, 2010

Jambon, buerre, et fromage

Walk down any street in Annecy's Centre Ville and tucked in between the larger merchants you'll find small prêt à emporter places where you can grab a sandwich or a small quiche, maybe an espresso. It's perfect for a quick bite when you're out exploring (or shopping!)

It was in one of those places where I tasted my first jambon- beurre. Served on a smaller-than-usual baguette, these sandwiches come wrapped in their own little bag which makes them easy to hold and eat on the go.

The combination of the creamy butter, the salty thinly sliced ham and cheese, and the crusty baguette makes these simple sandwiches irresistible. Here at home I've tried (oh how I've tried) to recreate the jambon-beurre, but with no success. You wonder "How hard can it be to make this? It's just a ham sandwich, after all!" But those of you who've had one of the sandwiches know what I'm talking about, n'est-ce pas?

So tell me, who among you has discovered the secret to the jambon-beurre?

14 comments:

  1. I suspect it must be the bread. It's so hard to re-create the delicious baguettes found in Paris.

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  2. It's the atmosphere!

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  3. I've never recreated it either, but I have a feeling it may be an atmosphere thing. I can never make an omelette that tastes as good as one served in a little backwater café in rural France either.....

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  4. Jambon buerre is my absolute favorite French sandwich (I like it without the fromage), how funny I am blogging about that in a post tomorrow!

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  5. Yum! Something special about the ham or butter?

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  6. The closest I've come is using an artisan butter from Vermont that I get at whole foods.... Name escapes me right now. But what's missing, I do believe, as everyone else said-the atmosphere- we can never recreate that:(

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  7. Jambon-beurre! My fave. The last time I had one was nearly 8 years ago on some steps at Versailles! I wish I could recreate that deliciousness!

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  8. i must say. ive never been to France... however i had a very thorough Frech teacher (Mme. Waclawek! i know the name is polish, she went to college in France!) and tonight i simply DEVOURED my version of a quite supereb 'jambon beurre'. Myself and my daughter and boyfriend had tortelloni with garlic bread for dinner. having a quite plump and VERY fresh ( like 3 hours old) hunk of french bread left over, I split the bread and SLATHERD both sides in sweet creamy butter. a pinch of salt got sprinkled over both sides, then I layered 4 slices of ham with 2 slices of cheese; Pressed it all together and bit into.... HEAVEN!!!! so good.. just close ur eyes an imagine!

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  9. What about the cheese? Does anyone know what type of cheese is used? Someone, somewhere said Gruyere.

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  10. I believe it is the ingredient...the spring water...I couldn't find it here, in Singapore too...oh, I miss Parisian baguette

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  11. I'm pretty sure it's emmental. Also make sure to use some
    Olive oil in the bread. They also use cream cheese and prosciutto as well.

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  12. This sandwich was so good when I first had it, way back in 1970, on the streets of Paris, that I have been looking for it ever since. It's not just the bread, but the ham and cheese, and the street vendor added something else, but I can't remember it. The sandwich is grilled and super good. I need to find them here in the US. I would love to find a good peroshki as well. Man, the street foods of Europe are fantastic!

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  13. 1 French baguette
    1/3 pound French ham, sliced thinly
    2 ounces aged gruyere - thinly sliced
    1 teaspoon dijon mustard
    2 tablespoons European butter

    Slice the baguette lengthwise.
    Spread the softened butter on one side of the baguette. Spread the mustard on the other side (should be very thin).
    Add the sliced ham gruyere. Top with the other slice of baguette. Wrap tightly with plastic wrap. This sandwich can sit for up to a day - and even improve - in the refrigerator.


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  14. It is the baguette. It takes a special flour and a very special stone oven to make. They are expensive and so never adopted here in the States, outside of Wegman's, which also stopped making them because of the expense.

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